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Friday, January 19, 2018
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Lost Louisiana »»»

Explore our state and her people.

Click here for the archives!

Take to the road across Louisiana to explore landmarks and institutions that are gone but not forgotten including a tribute to the Louisiana State University cadets of the Old War Skule the beautiful and lasting dignity of the Hotel Bentley in Alexandria, relive the warm feeling of dancing to the Russ Morgan Orchestra and rekindle a friendship with your favorite Kid’s TV Heroes as they return to the little screen. A retrospective of stories to help us all recall Louisiana’s unique history and folkways.

Episodes


Places of Worship
Five historic churches in Louisiana are spotlighted. Included: Grace Episcopal Church in St. Francisville; Madonna Chapel in Bayou Goula; St. Joseph’s Co-Cathedral in Thibodaux; Summer Grove Baptist Church in Shreveport; and Touro Synagogue in New Orleans.


What’s In A Name? V
This time Charlie visits the self-proclaimed “Frog Capital of the World” in Rayne and the tiny Sabine Parish village of Fisher (population 268 in the 2000 Census). He also answers the questions: Why would a town be named Cutoff and who is this man named Many and why did they name the town after him? Did you also know that Donaldsonville is not the original name of the parish seat in Ascension Parish? HD.


What’s In A Name? IV

Have you wondered how a town gets named Plain Dealing? When did the city of Thibodaux lose the “e” from its name? Was the town of Eunice named after a person? Charlie and the Lost Louisiana crew also head to Bogalusa and Opelousas to find out the origin of the town’s names. Charlie talks to local historians and long time residents to get the full story about the towns and cities. HD.


What’s In A Name? III

How does a town end up being named Mowatta? Why would you call your town Start? Charlie Whinham and the award-winning Lost Louisiana team hit the road again to find out. Visit Avery Island, Breaux Bridge and Turkey Creek to find out the origin of those town’s names. Whinham will interview local historians and longtime residents to find out how the towns were named and the significance of those names.


What’s In A Name? II

One look at a map of Louisiana, and you will see a number of towns with some unusual names. If names like Bunkie, Dry Prong, Tickfaw or Zwolle pique your curiosity, you’re not alone. Lost Louisiana host Charlie Whinham wonders how some of these towns and communities got their names. In this program, visit Natchitoches, New Roads, Iowa, Abita Springs and Mount Lebanon to find out firsthand how these towns got their names.


What’s In A Name? I

One look at a map of Louisiana, and you will see a number of towns with some unusual names. If names like Bunkie, Dry Prong, Tickfaw or Zwolle pique your curiosity, you’re not alone. Lost Louisiana host Charlie Whinham wonders how some of these towns and communities got their names. Lecompte, Louisiana, for example, was named after a world-class racehorse. Back in the late eighties, it also received national attention on “The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson.” Is Bunkie, Louisiana, actually named after a monkey? Did Zwolle derive its name from its famous tamales? You’ll find all those answers and more in this edition of Lost Louisiana: What’s In A Name?


Endangered Sites

Charlie Whinham travels throughout the state to visit six of the state’s endangered historical sites on the 14th edition of the series. Stops include a visit to the Geodesic Dome created by Buckminster Fuller for the Union Tank Car Company north of Baton Rouge and the historic Capitol House and Heidelberg Hotels in downtown Baton Rouge. In Vacherie, we visit Laura Plantation, which was damaged by fire in 2004. Then on to Lafayette to visit Holy Rosary Institute, a Catholic school founded in 1913 to educate African-American children. It closed in 1993. In Reserve, we stop by the Reserve-Godchaux Plantation House that was built in the early 19th Century and was owned in the 1820s by freemen of color. The final stop is the Old Baskin High School in Franklin Parish, which was built in 1925.


Postcards

This home video includes the entire thirteenth installment of LPB’s search for disappearing landmarks and forgotten corners of Louisiana. In a collection of essays, we visit the Jigger Post Office, a Carencro Gulf Station and Tallulah’s Hunting Camp, hidden for ninety years. In Monroe, a craftsman steers a Homemade Paddlewheeler. In The Big Easy, we ride a working Steam Train and a final spin at a Revolving Lounge. The final postcard comes from a tiny island in the Gulf where pelicans return from the brink.


Castaways

Castaways, the twelfth installment of Louisiana Public broadcasting’s Emmy-winning nostalgia series. Using a Louisiana Preservation Alliance list, we tour Monroe’s Grand Street, St. Francisville’s Rosedown Plantation, Bunkie’s Bennett Store, a sawmill at Long Leaf and Shreveport’s Pump Station. The list includes Tioga’s Commissary, Baton Rouge’s Train, 1930s Murals, Trinity Church in Cheneyville and Mansfield’s Battleground. This latest tour is a countdown of Louisiana history.


Homefront

Homefront is the eleventh installment in Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s Emmy-winning nostalgia series. We present a scrapbook of stories from World War II, including Pineville’s Louisiana Maneuvers, our memories of Pearl Harbor, Louisiana’s Fighting Tigers and Higgins’ Boats. Revisit Baton Rouge’s Harding Field, uncover a German U-Boat in the Gulf of Mexico and talk with the men of the 760th Tank Battalion. This poignant essay on Louisiana’s role in the war salutes our state’s unique patriotism and essential role in our nation’s greatest fight for freedom.


Rivers Run Deep: The Mississippi

Take a walk down Louisiana’s eastern border in this final of a trilogy of river essays from Louisiana Public Broadcasting. Uncover the secrets of Poverty Point and Grant’s Canal, see Winter Quarters in Newellton, hear the story of d’Iberville’s journey, tour Laura Plantation and stroll where the famous court case of Homer Plessy began. Join us as we go “Walking to New Orleans” in this poignant search for the vanishing landmarks and faded cultural icons of the Mississippi River Delta.


Rivers Run Deep: The Atchafalaya

The very name Atchafalaya is associated the world over with the Cajuns of its great basin. Its origins at Three Rivers is hard to define, but as it rolls past Fort DeRussy and the Simmesport Fish Market, the flavor of south Louisiana comes alive. Ride the Melville Ferry and rediscover Palmetto’s General Store, search for Cow Island, tour Breaux Bridge and St. Martinville, taste the sweets at LeJeune’s Bakery and hear Tugboat Jerry sing and carve toothpicks. Finally, watch a pirogue maker shape old wood. Savor a slice of life along one of America’s most famous and beautiful rivers.


Rivers Run Deep: The Red

The Red River cuts a powerful channel through the history of each community along its path. From quaint Plain Dealing and Minden’s German Village through the Civil War’s Red River Campaign, this is a journey you won’t soon forget. Stop in Natchitoches, the oldest city in the Louisiana Purchase and Kent House, Alexandria’s colonial treasure. Peek into a 1902 Colfax Hotel and visit the dedicated Italian Nuns of Moreauville. Enjoy the interesting landmarks and poignant history of the unspoiled Red River.


All the Small Places

This home video contains the entire seventh installment in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. Take to the road across Louisiana to explore vanishing landmarks and institutions including Haughton’s forgotten mercantile, and the friendly, perennial town of St. Francisville. Take a hike up Mount Driskill, lament the disappearing Manchac Lighthouse and enjoy the show one last time at Crowley’s Vaudeville Theater. “Lost Louisiana: All The Small Places” is a poignant trip down memory lane for anyone who treasures Louisiana’s unique history and folkways.


The Road Less Traveled II

This home video contains the entire sixth installment in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. We continue a tour of Highway One, Louisiana’s vanishing main street and a unique way of life starting with restorations to Huey Long’s Capitol, we’ll hear the histories of the important Plaquemine Locks and the colorful town of Donaldsonville, watch as Thibodaux’s Cajun boat builders keep tradition alive, visit a Virgin Mary Shrine, “pass a good time”at a Golden Meadow dance hall and, finally, dig for bottles on Grand Isle. Join Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s “Lost Louisiana” on the final leg of a personal tour of “The Road Less Traveled.”


The Road Less Traveled I

This home video contains the entire fifth installment in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. We begin a tour of Highway One, Louisiana’s vanishing main street, at Three Corners, the Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana state lines, meet a farmer content to grow Dixie Sunflowers, visit the site of the Battle of Mansfield, witness a Cane River baptism, tour Melrose Plantation, uncover a forgotten bank in Mansura, cross the Sarto Iron Bridge and shop at Lettsworth Country Store. Join Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s “Lost Louisiana” for a personal tour of “The Road Less Traveled.”


The Spirit Remains

This home video contains the entire fourth episode in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. Take to the road across Louisiana to explore landmarks and institutions that are gone but not forgotten including a tribute to an overlooked Franklin storekeeper, the tremendous talents of Shreveport’s “Leadbelly,” the emotional demolition of Thibodaux’s Grand Theater, a lesson in humanity as told by Ruston’s P.O.W Camp, the demise of LSU’s Free Speech Alley and the vanishing landmarks captured by a wise sketch artist. “Lost Louisiana: The Spirit Remains” is an impassioned eulogy for our vanishing way of life.


The Way We Were

This home video contains the entire third installment in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. Take to the road across Louisiana to explore landmarks and institutions that are gone but not forgotten including a tribute to the Louisiana State University cadets of the Old War Skule the beautiful and lasting dignity of the Hotel Bentley in Alexandria, relive the warm feeling of dancing to the Russ Morgan Orchestra and rekindle a friendship with your favorite Kid’s TV Heroes as they return to the little screen. “Lost Louisiana: The Way We Were” is a retrospective of stories to help us all recall Louisiana’s unique history and folkways.


Lost Louisiana II

This home video contains the entire second episode in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. Take to the road across Louisiana to explore landmarks and institutions that are gone but not forgotten including the haunting work of photographer Fonville Wynans, the restoration of Louisiana’s Old State Capitol, the closing of Airline Motors Restaurant in LaPlace and a take trip down a lonely road called Highway One. “Lost Louisiana II” is a cornucopia of stories that will long be treasured by everyone who loves Louisiana’s unique history and folkways.


Lost Louisiana I

This home video contains the entire first installment in the acclaimed Louisiana Public Broadcasting series of cultural specials. Take to the road across Louisiana to explore landmarks and institutions that are gone but not forgotten including Mervive Kahn’s department store in Rayne, the great Hurricane of 1893 that wiped out Cheniere Caminada, Irish Heritage of Louisiana restored along with a beautiful church, Shreveport’s Louisiana Hayride where country legends first played and the History of Jazz Music as its landmarks are slowly vanishing. “Lost Louisiana” is a poignant trip down memory lane for anyone who treasures Louisiana’s unique history and folkways.


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