08/10 - Crisis in the Gulf: The Oil Spill and Louisiana | Louisiana Public Square | LPB
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Monday, May 21, 2018
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Video Playlist:

Play Button  full show - Full Program
Play Button  backgrounder - Backgrounder
Play Button  extra - Is Louisiana another Alaska? - Aaron Viles, with the Gulf Restoration Network, a coordination of representatives from various conservation organizations across the Gulf of Mexico, touches on his concerns regarding the oil spill and Louisiana fisheries.
Play Button  extra - A "troubling" government response - Aaron Viles, with the Gulf Restoration Network, a coordination of representatives from various conservation organizations across the Gulf of Mexico, says the response he has seen from the government following the oil spill was troubling.
Play Button  extra - Dispersant Uncertainty - Ralph Portier, Ph.D, an aquatic and marine toxicologist with LSU, voices his concerns about the use of dispersants to combat the oil spill.
Play Button  extra - Overlooked Oil - Ralph Portier, Ph.D, an aquatic and marine toxicologist with LSU, gives his opinion on amount of oil remaining.
Play Button  extra - "...the spill is not over." - Ralph Portier, Ph.D, an aquatic and marine toxicologist with LSU, touches on the legacy of the oil spill.

08/10 - Crisis in the Gulf: The Oil Spill and Louisiana

What is the impact of the oil spill on the landscape and livelihood of the people of Louisiana?

On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded, killing eleven workers and setting into motion one of the nation’s worst environmental accidents. By May, Louisiana had a “crude awakening” as heavy oil began washing into its marshland. Three months and 4.9 million barrels later, the well has been capped but the amount of oil that remains in the Gulf equals nearly five times the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez, posing unknown risks to the environment and fisheries. State business groups and political leaders say that the federal ban on deepwater drilling imposed in response to the spill is crippling the oil and gas industry and costing thousands of jobs. And while BP has paid out nearly $300 million, more than 100,000 people are still waiting to hear about their claims.

Louisiana Public Square travels to Buras – the “Gateway to the Gulf” - to explore the impact of the oil spill on the landscape and livelihood of its people. Join residents, government officials, environmental authorities and wildlife and fisheries experts as they discuss the response and the ramifications to our state of the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

Watch “Crisis in the Gulf: The Oil Spill and Louisiana” airing statewide, Wednesday, August 25th at 7 p.m. on LPB HD.

For the most up-to-date oil spill information visit http://www.lpb.org/oilspill

CLAIMS INFORMATION:

Beginning August 23, 2010, the Gulf Coast Claims Facility began handling of all oil spill related claims.

For information on how to file an oil spill related claim, visit http://www.gulfcoastclaimsfacility.com

Transcript of Gulf Coast Claims Facility administrator, Kenneth Feinberg explaining the new claims process.



PBS NEWSHOUR:

Tom Bearden posted on "The Rundown"

At Louisiana Forum, Questions on Oil Spill's Long-Term Impact



Click here to take the online survey

Click here to view the online survey results

Our Panelists:

This program was also funded in part by the Louisiana Forestry Association

We want to know your opinion! Leave your comments in the box below.


I think tonight’s Public Square on the oil spill was one of the best yet. Great guests, great questions, great video, great moderating. Save that one for the archives and put it in the
“good” pile. 

Miriam Davey

Posted by Miriam Davey  on  09/14  at  02:38 PM

The American people should know that from the moment this disaster began, the federal government has been in charge of the response effort. 
As far as I’m concerned, BP is responsible for this horrific disaster, and we will hold them fully accountable on behalf of the United States as well as the people and communities victimized by this tragedy. 
We will demand that they pay every dime they owe for the damage they’ve done and the painful losses that they’ve caused.  And we will continue to take full advantage of the unique technology and expertise they have to help stop this leak.

Posted by pedro  on  11/09  at  11:15 AM
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     05/18 - News About the News

How can viewers distinguish between fact and fake news and is social media blurring the difference?
According to the 2018 Louisiana Survey, when it comes to trusting news organizations, more Louisiana residents put their faith in local media than national media outlets. Despite that trust, only 36 percent of the state’s news consumers say local news deals fairly with both sides.

So, why is there so much mistrust of the news media? What role has the downsizing of traditional media played in creating a gap in coverage and possibly, community trust? Where are consumers primarily getting their news? And, how can viewers distinguish between fact and fake news and is social media blurring the difference? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers to these questions and more on “News about the News” airing Wednesday, May 23 at 7pm on LPB and in New Orleans on WLAE. (Recording Tuesday, May 22)

Our panelists are:
• Len Apcar, Wendell Gray Switzer Jr. Endowed Chair in Media Literacy, LSU Manship School
• Jarvis DeBerry, Deputy Opinion Editor, New Orleans Times-Picayune
• Peter Kovacs, Editor, The Advocate
• Lance Porter, Director, LSU Social Media Analysis & Creation Lab

LPB CEO, Beth Courtney and journalist and political historian, Bob Mann moderate the discussion. The program features interviews with Michael Henderson, director of the LSU Public Policy Research Lab; Ray Pingree, Associate Professor wth the LSU Manship School of Communication; John DeSantis, Senior Staff Writer for The Houma Times and Judi Terzotis, president of The Advocate.

Louisiana Public Square can also be heard on public radio stations WRKF in Baton Rouge; Red River Radio in Shreveport and Monroe; and WWNO in New Orleans. Check their station websites for schedule.
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