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06/15 - Louisiana After Ferguson (Encore Presentation)

06/15 - Louisiana After Ferguson (Encore Presentation)

Who polices the police in Louisiana?

The death of a black male while in the custody of the Baltimore Police Department in April sparked protests and passionate debates around the country. In January, following similar incidents in Ferguson, Missouri and Staten Island, New York, Louisiana Public Square examined the tactics that law enforcement officers use in their interactions with the public, particularly African-Americans
.
Join Louisiana Public Square in June for an encore broadcast of “Louisiana After Ferguson” to explore who polices the police in Louisiana? Is the mistrust of law enforcement by the black community justified? And, how effective are the use of police body cameras? Catch an encore presentation of “Louisiana After Ferguson” Wednesday, June 24 at 7 pm on LPB HD.

Full Program, click here!


I would like to comment/suggest on the show that was presented on 06/28/15, but was originally aired on 12/24/2014 with the topic “Louisiana after Ferguson”, racial profiling, mistrust of law enforcement in the black community.” I believe if we really want to try and make a change, the powers that be as high as the President of the U.S. down to the everyday school teacher, will have to appeal to the groups who have the most influence on our communities. The groups I am referring to are actors, musicians, professional athletes, etc. These are the people our children and most grown ups look up to and emulate. We need to try and influence these “stars” to stop making violent, sexually perverted, emotionally detached movies. There was a time when movies were played and it had blood in it, the viewers would turn away. Now blood is almost a requirement to make the movie sell now. There is also no fear of God in anyone anymore. It’s just a free for all society now. Everyone is so distracted, cell phones, internet, television. As a child I recalled when the television went off at 12 midnight and all shows resumed the next morning. We need to get back to some of the old ways. Turn the TV off and spend time with your kids so they will not grow up angry and have no direction. Until then, we will continue to have these problems. Racism has always been there since the beginning of time and it’s not going away. We all have some bias ways, but it’s the lack of respect for self and others is what’s the root of the problem. It all begins at the house with “Yes ma’am, no ma’am” “Yes sir, no sir”, not “What?”, or “Leave me alone, I’m busy” or putting his/her headphones on to avoid hearing their parents at all so they can “honestly” say “I didn’t hear you”. We need to put the 3 P’s back in school, Paddling, Prayer, The Pledge of Allegiance. There is no discipline, no praise to one who woke us up to see another day, and no allegiance to the country we live in. Thank you for this opportunity to express my views.

Posted by Chester Davis  on  06/29  at  09:04 AM

Who polices the police in Louisiana?

If no one is willing to police the police, then police body cameras must be used.

It does not make any sense for a person to do a job and no one supervises the job duties of that person.

Is the mistrust of law enforcement by the black community justified?

Yes. If people in “other” communities are asked the same question, we will discover that it’s not just a “black” thing.

How effective are the use of police body cameras?

Police body cameras will be very effective. The cameras will catch good police officers and bad police officers.

We might discover that there are many more good police officers than bad police officers.

Posted by Wright  on  07/15  at  03:48 PM

I agree with your article..These days, with all the corrupt law enforcement and unjustifiable killings (without prosecution), the least the government can do is to attached cameras to the officers who are granted God’s power in their eyes. Something has to be done so they have limits to the power over those they are sworn to protect and serve.

Posted by Tampa  on  07/17  at  02:27 AM

Is the mistrust of law enforcement by the black community justified? Yes. If people in “other” communities are asked the same question, we will discover that it’s not just a “black” thing. How effective are the use of police body cameras? Police body cameras will be very effective. The cameras will catch good police officers and bad police officers.

Posted by Peter  on  08/05  at  01:30 PM
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Current Topic


     09/18 - Revisiting Reform

Are the criminal justice reforms working as intended?
In 2017, Louisiana’s legislature passed the Justice Reinvestment Act, which sought to reduce the state’s highest-in-the-nation incarceration rate. The bill was championed by Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards and received bipartisan support including from community and business leaders. Now, just over a year later, the legislation has become a political football. State Attorney General Jeff Landry and Senator John Kennedy, both Republicans considering a run against Edwards in 2019, suggest that the reform package is a failure. They cite murders committed by two inmates released since the Act’s implementation.

Are the criminal justice reforms working as intended? Has the legislation put more residents in harm’s way or are plea deals part of the problem?

Louisiana Public Square looks for answers to these questions and more on “Revisiting Reform” Wednesday, September 26 at 7pm on LPB and in New Orleans on WLAE.

Our panelists are:
• E. Pete Adams, Executive Director, La. District Attorneys Association
• Alanah Hebert, ACLU of Louisiana & Justice Reinvestment Task Force
• Andrew Hundley, Louisiana Parole Project
• Sec. Jimmy LeBlanc, La. Department of Corrections

The program features interviews with Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry; Rep. Terry Landry, D- New Iberia, with the Justice Reinvestment Oversight Council; Deputy Assistant Secretary Natalie Laborde, with the Louisiana Department of Corrections; and Stephanie Riegel, editor of the Baton Rouge Business Report.

LPB CEO, Beth Courtney and professor Robert Mann with the LSU Manship School of Mass Communication host the show.

Louisiana Public Square can also be heard on public radio stations WRKF in Baton Rouge; Red River Radio in Shreveport and Monroe; and WWNO in New Orleans. Check their station websites for schedule.

Learn More!
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