04/14 - State Contracts 101 | Louisiana Public Square | LPB
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Video Playlist:

Play Button  full show - Full program
Play Button  extra - Degrees of State Contracts - Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana president Robert Travis Scott describes the different levels of state contracts.
Play Button  extra - Re HB 128 - Robert Travis Scott, Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana president, gives his opinion on HB128, the Privatization Review Act.
Play Button  extra - Re HB 142 - Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana president Robert Travis Scott offers his views on HB 142 which calls for a 10% reduction of state contracts.
Play Button  extra - Funding Challenges - Former state Medicaid Director, Don Gregory, expresses his concerns about the funding stream of the state charity hospital public/private partnerships.
Play Button  extra - State Budgets - Louisiana State Treasurer John Kennedy feels that the money is there in the state budget for Higher Ed if better spending decisions are made.
Play Button  extra - 10% Reduction - State Rep. Jerome “Dee” Richard, I – Thibodaux, explains the goal of his HB 142.
Play Button  extra - Good Government Bill - State Rep. Jerome “Dee” Richard, I-Thibodaux feels HB 142 is a “good government bill.”
Play Button  extra - HB 128 Explained - State Rep. Kenneth Havard, R-Jackson, explains his Privatization Review Act proposal.
Play Button  extra - Privatization Ethics Concerns - State Rep. Kenneth Havard, R- Jackson, touches on ethics concerns he has with Louisiana charter schools.

04/14 - State Contracts 101

Will proposed legislation help rein in costs or create arbitrary caps that hinder agencies in delivering services?

A big push by Governor Jindal has been the privatization of state government operations which he says will save taxpayer money. To accomplish this, the state has contracted with outside providers for professional, personal and consulting services. Currently, Louisiana has nearly 13,000 active contracts - the majority for $50,000 or more.

A proposed bill this legislative session would reduce state spending on contracts by 10 percent. But the Jindal administration says that contracting in state government is already being reduced. And some of the biggest contracts are essential to provide assistance to the public such as the administration of health insurance programs or to fill drug prescriptions for retirees.

So, is the privatization of state services through contracts cost-effective? And how necessary and appropriate are the majority of state contracts? Will proposed legislation help rein in their costs or create arbitrary caps that hinder agencies in delivering much-needed services? Louisiana Public Square educates viewers about the issue on “State Contracts 101” Wednesday, April 23 at 7 p.m. on LPB HD.

Backgrounder

According to the Division of Administration’s Louisiana Transparency & Accountability (LaTRAC) online database, Louisiana is currently involved in 12,948 active contracts with a total value of $19.5 billion. Just more than half of these are for $50,000 or greater.

...Read Full Backgrounder

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Our Panelists:

Additional Resources

LaTrac – Division of Administration’s State Contract Search web page

Louisiana State Contracts – Download page for all active state contracts

Louisianasunshine.org – Pelican Institute for Public Policy open government website

State contracts are needed.  All areas of state government have become dependent upon many of the various contracts, and there will always be a need to execute and monitor these mutually beneficial endeavors.  There are, however, obvious pitfalls involved with state contracts.  Besides tons of red tape and large transactions of money, contractors are increasingly becoming more powerful (regardless of political affiliation).  Some believe that contractors are becoming the ones who now “make the rules”.  Independent groups are necessary to facilitate these contracts and enforce the rules.  When it gets to the point that the public has no idea who is bidding on the work, it reminds me of unfortunate opportunities hinted in Mathew 6:3
“If you should ever be betrayed into any of these philanthropies, do not let your left hand know what your right hand does, for it is not worth knowing.”
In business, one should keep one’s interests independent of each other.  This is why Ethics Laws should not be taken lightly IMO.

Posted by Alex Broussard  on  04/23  at  02:04 PM

Just for the record: when I said on the show I’d like to see private schools do well, under no circumstances would I support vouchers or any use of public funds to support them.  Also, the issue of frivolous contracts presented a kind of red herring during the show.  The privatization of education, healthcare and corrections in Louisiana would represent, in my view, an abdication of government responsibility.  Privatization of decision-making affecting an individual’s rights, such as the student’s right to a balanced and standard curriculum in our publicly funded schools, would dilute the premise of government “by the people.”

Posted by William F. Bertolette  on  04/23  at  08:15 PM

This is a disgrace to humanity. The gov. is wasting money on uselessness. All people need is great health. Resources funding like food and Cash money. Tired of hearing excuses from DCFS and many other services. Why they can’t do this don’t do that. Not even doing their jobs defeating the purposes of vital resources. How can you give Family Services to Single Parents? Not to Families.  Still call it a family service. A family consist of A father and mother with children. What’s really going on here backwards! Made up as you go policies suck. They should all be fired. Hire real people not heartless animals. Looking for a quick way to murder the budget. Keep people sick out here. Stop putting money in useless bills programs for foolishness. Maybe Louisiana will come out of poverty one day victorious. God is Love not hatred. Take care of all families not just selected few. Give back the benefits taken away by filthy policies NOW!

Posted by JG  on  04/24  at  03:59 PM

I just watched Louisiana the State we are in. The segment that caught my attention was the effort of John Kennedy to save tax payers money by reducing the amount paid to consultants. I am a former state worker. I was stunned when I saw the overhead for a few of the many contracts that allow overhead to double or triple the money paid for actual services. The state of LA is paying engineers and other professionals to produce. All I saw was people making close to 3 figures babysitting the consultants. Keep digging.

Posted by P. dixon  on  04/28  at  11:53 AM

General Contractors are not ruling now,they are also tired of endless bureaucracy and excessive red tapes everywhere…trying to have their voice heard

Posted by Dara  on  05/16  at  12:51 AM
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Current Topic


     09/18 - Revisiting Reform

Are the criminal justice reforms working as intended?
In 2017, Louisiana’s legislature passed the Justice Reinvestment Act, which sought to reduce the state’s highest-in-the-nation incarceration rate. The bill was championed by Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards and received bipartisan support including from community and business leaders. Now, just over a year later, the legislation has become a political football. State Attorney General Jeff Landry and Senator John Kennedy, both Republicans considering a run against Edwards in 2019, suggest that the reform package is a failure. They cite murders committed by two inmates released since the Act’s implementation.

Are the criminal justice reforms working as intended? Has the legislation put more residents in harm’s way or are plea deals part of the problem?

Louisiana Public Square looks for answers to these questions and more on “Revisiting Reform” Wednesday, September 26 at 7pm on LPB and in New Orleans on WLAE.

Our panelists are:
• E. Pete Adams, Executive Director, La. District Attorneys Association
• Alanah Hebert, ACLU of Louisiana & Justice Reinvestment Task Force
• Andrew Hundley, Louisiana Parole Project
• Sec. Jimmy LeBlanc, La. Department of Corrections

The program features interviews with Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry; Rep. Terry Landry, D- New Iberia, with the Justice Reinvestment Oversight Council; Deputy Assistant Secretary Natalie Laborde, with the Louisiana Department of Corrections; and Stephanie Riegel, editor of the Baton Rouge Business Report.

LPB CEO, Beth Courtney and professor Robert Mann with the LSU Manship School of Mass Communication host the show.

Louisiana Public Square can also be heard on public radio stations WRKF in Baton Rouge; Red River Radio in Shreveport and Monroe; and WWNO in New Orleans. Check their station websites for schedule.

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